CoC Campaign #2: Kampfgruppe von Luck Turns 1 and 2

 

Played the first two games of the Chain of Command Kampfgruppe von Luck campaign with my mate Adam Clark. This is a historical campaign, constructed by Richard Clarke after much research (as is typical for his games).

I am playing a Brit Airborne platoon who has dropped in on D-Day to help secure bridges behind the enemy lines. Adam is playing the German 21st Panzer, made famous for their conversion of French vehicles into German fighting machines.

Campaign Turn One, Scenario One

The Brits have to roll a few times on their first campaign turn to see how many of their troops actually landed and managed to form up a fighting force. The first time we played this it was so bad for the Brits (and we screwed up a few important rules) we decided to do a Mulligan.

The second time the rolls for what forces showed up was much better for the Brits. They were missing some key elements of their force, but it was not catastrophic. Nonetheless the Germans won the first round after inflicting some heavy casualties on the Brits. Not a great start for me, but given the historical scenario, this is to be expected in this campaign.

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Scenario One: Germans attacking a scattered Brit Airborne force

 

Campaign Turn Two, Scenario Two

This is Scenario Two from the rulebook – Probe. The Germans have to exit one team off the table on the Brit end (top of the diagram). Most of my forces assembled for this scenario, I was only missing one Bren gun team from Section 3.

I got what I wanted out of the patrol phase, basically taking up the hedgerow overlooking my left flank as well as some defence in depth in the top left corner of the map (the blue circles).

Adam was the attacker and deployed his first jump-off point aggressively on his right flank. The other two were about as I would have expected (the red circles).

Adam pushed up on his right flank with two sections. He came very close to overwhelming the forces on my left flank. Ultimately I had to deploy all my infantry sections to that area in order to hold off his advance. However, he did very little damage to my forces and I effectively wiped out both sections.

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Germans attempt to advance with supporting fire from their left flank
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Scenario Two: The Germans have to push across this terrain
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British Airborne mow down Panzergrenadiers in the open

 

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The failed assault: many German casualties and a big hit to their Force Morale

After his failed assault on my left flank, Adam was tenuous on Force Morale. We were running out of time as he had to catch a flight. Adam decided to go for a “Hail Mary” and pushed one infantry section and a Panzerschreck team up on his left flank.

I had deployed all of my forces on my left to deal with the assault, so now it was a matter of me trying to get one section over to defend before Adam got a team across my table edge.

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The race: Germans push up the road, one Brit section shifts over to stop them
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Brits (on left) making their way to stop the Germans from getting off the table
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Victory was in sight for the Germans
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Germans drop a mortar strike, forcing the Brits to take the long way ’round

After dropping a mortar strike and blocking the Brits advance on the Germans making a break for victory, the phase turned over to me. Although we were in a sort of “nail biter”, Adam had to catch a flight home.

A few days later we continued the game using Google Hangouts video conferencing. Although I would not want to play a complete game like this, given how far we were into the game and that Adam was familiar with the table, it worked really well to finish things off.

I realized that I could break Adam’s force morale by grinding down the forces on my left flank. I had a CoC dice stored up and could cause some heavy morale tests by ending the turn. I rolled what I needed on what would turn out to be my final phase. I laid into the retreating Germans. Ultimately this cause them to break. I ended the turn and no matter what Adam rolled his Force Morale was going to drop to zero.

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The remainder of two mauled German sections, their leaders, and the Brits that did the damage in the background.
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The ending force morale and casualties: routed Germans, victorious Brits
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The battlefield at the end, as seen from a Fiessler Storch assessing the damage
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The tally of the results, noting German Platoon 2 is heavily battered

The Result

These were two great games. The second was outstanding, possibly the best CoC game I have played. Adam is a very difficult opponent. Finishing it off over Google Hangouts was interesting, workable for a table both players are familiar with.

This is one of 4 victories the Brits need to win the campaign. I have the option of attacking in the next turn on this same table. Haven’t decided what to do yet, not sure when we will play again, but I am looking forward to it.

Cheers.

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2 thoughts on “CoC Campaign #2: Kampfgruppe von Luck Turns 1 and 2

  1. Definitely counter-attack, you’ve got nothing to lose. Even if it looks like going badly for you you can just break off and he’ll still have to take this table the turn after.

    Trying to blast over those open fields on foot was a bold move from the Germans. I’ve always seen this scenario as a good opportunity for the Germans to use their vehicles. Dominate one of the roads with the SP howitzer, then charge down it in a half track or two.

  2. Yeah if I understand the rules, a Brit counter attack here would take place on Table 1. Nothing to lose from a Brit perspective, and silly not to counter attack as it costs the Germans 2 turns of delay. That doesn’t really make sense to me, so I am hoping the CoCmmunity can clarify if it should be Table 1 or Table 2 for the counter attack.

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